Category Archives: Monetary Policy - 12 posts found

UK Credit and Money Growth at Extremes

Easy monetary policy in the UK is looking ever more inappropriate.  Divisia money is a weighted money-supply measure.  Higher forms of money, eg notes and coins have greater weights than less liquid forms of money, such as building society deposits. …


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Variant Perception on the US labour market and the future course of Fed policy

simon white

Variant Perception’s editor Simon White spoke to BNN this morning about the future course of Fed policy and the US labour market. Highlights included the likelihood that the Fed will stay looser for longer as well as how the market may have overestimated the actual pace of tapering.


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The case of the disappearing liquidity in corporate bond markets

One of the themes that we have been highlighting this year is the growing bubble in corporate bonds. It is pointless in the first instance to discuss whether super easy monetary policy that has fueled this bubble is appropriate or not. The main thing for investors to countenance is that the current monetary policy regime is having unintended consequences through the formation of a bubble in increasingly scarce liquid fixed income instruments.


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Central bankers and politicians getting complacent

The economy and financial markets remain in the grips of the most easiest monetary policy the world has ever seen. The balance sheets at the Fed and the BOJ continue to expand at record pace and global real rates have been negative for over 3 years now. Negative real rates create tremendous incentives for borrowers to lever up and often create asset bubbles in debt, equity and property.


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Bonds and Stocks are Still Mispriced

No-one ever said that investing was easy, but when textbook correlations start to break down it can be outright painful. Such of course has been the environment in recent couple of months with stocks and bonds falling in unison. It won’t last forever, but it may persist for a while longer.


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Structural labour market issues in the US point to looser for longer at the Fed

Employment in the US is closely watched, especially as the Fed has marked it out as an important factor in how it will judge its stance in monetary policy. Payrolls have improved and the unemployment rate has declined, but structural issues stubbornly remain. The Fed will be alert to these issues, and thus the bar for the removal of stimulus is very high, despite repeated murmurings of ‘tapering’ and a tightening in monetary conditions.


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The Foolproof Way To Fight Deflation or the Road to Ruin?

The Euro is making headlines again, this time not due to its possible imminent disappearance as a currency but rather as a result of what many regard as its undue strength. Last week’s press briefing comments by ECB President Mario Draghi to the effect that “The exchange rate is not a policy target but it is important for growth and price stability,” had put markets on their guard that the central bank was taking note of recent currency movements, and especially those vis-à-vis the Japanese yen.


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Japan Edges Towards the Cliff

The Japanese economy continues to weaken and a recession is now the main consensus. The country’s trade balance, which was long in surplus, is now moving deeper and deeper into deficit and the third quarter numbers almost certainly will show contraction, and these are more than likely to be followed by another set of negative readings for Q4


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EURCHF Floor Vulnerable as SNB Sterilizes Much of FX Intervention

The SNB lately reiterated its stance to maintain a EURCHF floor of 1.20. In the process, the SNB has amassed billions of foreign currency-denominated assets, about half of which is EUR, and certainly some of dubious quality (some of the recent moves tighter in French yields have been due to Swiss central bank buying, who have been deterred from channelling any further flows into short-term German bonds paying negative yields).


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US Bond Market Pricing in Stagflation and not Deflation

The US CPI is currently just above target at 2.3%, and long-term market expectations of inflation measured by the US inflation swap curve remains mid-range. This is in stark contrast to all-time lows in nominal treasury yields which appear to be pricing in almost the end of the world.


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