Tag Archives: europe - 10 posts found

Negative Feedback Loop in Europe

While most of the attention post-Brexit has been on the UK, we are far more concerned about Europe.  Markets and the economy operate in a feedback loop, and the performance of European banks relative to the stock market points to…


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Monetary Policy Still Too Hot for Germany

An ongoing theme we kept coming back to throughout 2015 in the eurozone is that monetary policy tends to either too hot or too cold for the core or periphery.  The ECB’s attempts to fight deflation and reflate the periphery…


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European Recovery: Periphery Loan-growth Needed

One of the aims of loose monetary policy is to boost lending.  The theory is lower rates and greater availability of liquidity will encourage lending and borrowing, which in turn will boost economic activity.  Unfortunately, an increased supply of loans…


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Despite the rout, excess liquidity will prove to be supportive

  Stock markets are experiencing a classic crash pattern.  Volatility has spiked and sharp sell offs are often being followed by powerful rallies.  As with previous crash patterns, we would expect markets to continue to gyrate wildly for around the next…


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Money surges in Europe, growth to follow

If you ignore the ongoing Greek sideshow, rarely has European money growth been as accommodative as it is today. Europe has enormous structural problems of too much debt, an inflexible currency and an ageing population, but cyclical factors are very…


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A Primer on the Euro Breakup

euro

Many economists expect catastrophic consequences if any country exits the euro. However, during the past century sixty-nine countries have exited currency areas with little downward economic volatility. The mechanics of currency breakups are complicated but feasible, and historical examples provide a road map for exit.

The real problem in Europe is that EU peripheral countries face severe, unsustainable imbalances in real effective exchange rates and external debt levels that are higher than most previous emerging market crises. Orderly defaults and debt rescheduling coupled with devaluations are inevitable and even desirable. Exiting from the euro and devaluation would …


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Eurozone Growth Stuck in a Quagmire

Eurozone growth goes from setback to setback with last week’s GDP number being just the latest in a long line of similar disappointments. Soft indicators have consistently overstated the strength of this year’s recovery, and the unpleasant truth is that as one country after another has swooned under the summer heat we are down to Spain as ‘last man standing’. Our leading indicators are pointing to anaemic growth ahead for much of the eurozone and Russia’s recent food sanctions on European agriculture will only add to the downturn.


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Market is likely getting ahead of itself on European equities

The composite eurozone January flash PMI showed accelerating expansion led by Germany, but the PMI readings are still only showing moderate growth, considerably below the momentum achieved, for example, in the 2009/2010 green-shoots revival. What growth we do see will be low in comparison with earlier times and if real money growth continues to lose momentum, we might even see renewed weakness.


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Fiscal austerity in the eurozone: Spain dissents and Italy delivers, but at a price

Greece is in default and Ireland and Portugal are in limbo with the market pricing in a Greek outcome in both economies. However, the situation has changed in Spain and Italy and on this measure alone, the ECB’s LTRO has been successful.


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A Primer on the Euro Breakup

euro

Many economists expect catastrophic consequences if any country exits the euro. However, during the past century sixty-nine countries have exited currency areas with little downward economic volatility. The mechanics of currency breakups are complicated but feasible, and historical examples provide a road map for exit.

The real problem in Europe is that EU peripheral countries face severe, unsustainable imbalances in real effective exchange rates and external debt levels that are higher than most previous emerging market crises. Orderly defaults and debt rescheduling coupled with devaluations are inevitable and even desirable. Exiting from the euro and devaluation would …


Read more